24 May 2011

NOTICE: New Titles from Hart Publishing

Note the following title from Hart Publishing. Don't forget our discount (see right-hand side panel):

Research Methodologies in EU and International Law
Robert Cryer, Tamara Hervey and Bal Sokhi-Bulley, with Alexandra Bohm

Law research students often begin their PhDs without having an awareness of methodology, or the opportunity to think about the practice of research and its theoretical implications. Law Schools are, however, increasingly alive to the need to provide training in research methods to their students. They are also alive to the need to develop the research capacities of their early career scholars, not least for the Research Excellence Framework exercise. This book offers a structured approach to doing so, focusing on issues of methodology - ie, the theoretical elements of research - within the context of EU and international law.

The book can be used alone, or could form the basis of a seminar-based course, or a departmental, or even regional, discussion group. At the core of the book are the materials produced for a series of workshops, funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council's Collaborative Doctoral Training Fund, on Legal Research Methodologies in EU and international law. These materials consist of a document with readings on main and less mainstream methodological approaches (what we call modern and critical approaches, and the 'law and' approaches) to research in EU and international law, and a series of questions and exercises which encourage reflection on those readings, both in their own terms, and in terms of different research agendas. There are also supporting materials, giving guidance on practical matters, such as how to give a paper or be a discussant at an academic conference.

The basic aim of the book is to help scholars in EU and international law reflect on their research: where does it fit within the discipline, what kinds of research questions they think interesting, how do they pursue them, what theoretical perspective best supports their way of thinking their project, and so on. The book is aimed both at PhD students and early career scholars in EU and international law, and also at more established scholars who are interested in reflecting on the development of their discipline, as well as supervising research projects.

Cases and Materials on EU Private International Law
Stefania Bariatti

Since the Amsterdam Treaty of 1997 empowered the EC to adopt rules in the field of conflicts of laws, legal instruments have been adopted that provide common rules on issues that touch upon the day-to-day life of European citizens. There are now instruments covering jurisdiction and the recognition and enforcement of judgments in civil and commercial matters, family matters and maintenance obligations, and the law applicable to contractual and non-contractual obligations, legal separations and divorces. There is also legislation establishing swift procedures for recovering claims abroad, ie the European Enforcement Order, the European Order for Payment Procedure and the European Small Claims Procedure, and legislation regulating cross-border insolvency proceedings and judicial assistance in the field of service of documents, taking of evidence and access to justice. This long list of EU legislation is not exhaustive of EU conflicts of laws rules: numerous further provisions are scattered among other EU legislation, eg directives on consumer, labour and insurance contracts; company law; IP rights; securities; privacy; and so on. Besides this the European Court of Justice has issued many judgments addressing relevant aspects of the conflict of laws found in the acquis communautaire in this field. This book, which assembles all the relevant EU legislation and ECJ decisions in one place, provides a guide to the maze of legal instruments now in place, supplemented by brief commentaries identifying the leading principles and anticipating future developments.

Beyond the Established Legal Orders: Policy Interconnections between the EU and the Rest of the World
Edited by Malcolm Evans and Panos Koutrakos

A lively debate on the constitutionalisation of the international legal order has emerged in recent years. A similar debate has also taken place within the European Union. This book complements that debate, exploring the underlying realities that the moves towards constitutionalism seek to address. It does this by focusing on the substantive interconnections that the EU has developed over the years with the rest of the world, and assesses the practical impact these have both in the development of its legal order as well as in the international community.

Based on papers delivered at the bi-annual EU/International Law Forum organised by the University of Bristol in March 2009, this collection of essays examines policy areas of economic governance (trade, financial services, migration, environment), political governance (human rights, criminal law, responses to financing terrorism), security governance (counter-terrorism, use of force, non-proliferation), and the issue of the emergence of European and global values. How are these areas shaped by the interaction between EU law and other legal orders and polities? In what ways does the EU impact on other transnational legal systems? And how are its own rules and principles shaped by such systems? These questions are addressed in the light of the specific legal and political context within which the EU pursues its policies by interacting with the rest of the world.

Principles of European Constitutional Law (Second edition)
Edited by Armin von Bogdandy and Jürgen Bast

For the time being, the political project of basing the European Union on a document entitled 'Constitution' has failed. The second, revised and enlarged edition of this volume retains its title nonetheless. Building on a scholarly rather than black-letter law account, it shows European constitutional law as it looks following the Treaty of Lisbon, with the EU's foundational treaties mandating the exercise of public authority, establishing a hierarchy of norms and legitimising legal acts, providing for citizenship, and granting fundamental rights. In this way the treaties shape the relations between legal orders, between public interest regulation and market economy, and between law and politics. The contributions demonstrate in detail how a constitutional approach furthers understanding of the core issues of EU law, how it offers theoretical and doctrinal insights, and how it adds critical perspective.

Reappraising the Resort to Force: International Law, Jus ad Bellum and the War on Terror (new in paperback)
Lindsay Moir

A number of commentators assert that the military response to the terrorist atrocities of 11 September 2001 - encompassing attacks on Afghanistan and Iraq, and commonly referred to as the 'war on terror' - has significantly impacted upon the international law regulating resort to armed force by states (jus ad bellum), loosening the constraints on self-defence. Some even suggest that the very future of the United Nations, in particular the Security Council and its collective security system, is at risk - at least in its current form. This book does not address the question of the future of the United Nations, an issue probably best left to scholars of international relations. Instead, it seeks to place the 'war on terror' within the context of international law, assessing how, or whether, it can be accommodated within the existing legal framework limiting the use of force. Through an examination of the lawfulness (or otherwise) of both Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom, including the legal justifications advanced by those states involved and the reaction of the international community, and involving a detailed discussion of the most important developments (ie, the permissibility of self-defence against non-state, terrorist, actors and the 'Bush doctrine' of pre-emptive self-defence against terrorists as proclaimed in the 2002 US National Security Strategy) the book determines whether, and to what extent, the right to use force - or the acceptability of such military action - is currently undergoing a radical transformation. By assessing subsequent developments illustrating the impact that military action against Afghanistan and Iraq has had on the jus ad bellum, this book represents a distinctive and original contribution to the academic literature.

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